Laura Yohualtlahuiz Rios-Ramirez

Laura Yohualtlahuiz Rios-Ramirez is a Mexican-born Xicana scholar-practitioner of Tepehuan, Guachichil, French, and Spanish descent trained in educational pedagogy, circle keeping, performance art, and community organizing.

About

Currently residing in occupied Somi Se’k Territory of Yanaguana, (San Antonio, TX) she's recognized for her canon of healing-informed praxis intersecting performance art, ancestral knowledge systems and restorative/transformative justice practices as tools for personal and collective transformation. She holds a BA in International Relations and Latin American Studies and a MS in Organizational Leadership and is currently a Southwest Folklife Fellow and Intercultural Leadership Institute Fellow focusing on Participatory Action Research and Cultural Leadership. She co-leads, Kalpulli Ayolopaktzin, a transnational inter-tribal group of families preserving Nahuatlaca teachings, leads Teoaxictli Activation Movement Practices, is a veteran Bgirl/Hip Hop dancer, a wife, and most importantly a mami passionate about healing intergenerational/colonial trauma through matriarchal leadership, cultural resilience and folklife preservation.  Laura is a Co-Founder and Visionary behind De Corazón Circles, a consulting and capacity building firm that envisions a safe and equitable world where restorative interactions transform individuals, relationships, communities and systems through the prevention, repair and deep healing of harm

E-Mail:  laura.k.rios@gmail.com

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photo of Laura Rios-Ramirez

Agenda

Oct
19
Different Histories, Parallel Stories: Black and Native People Bridging for Climate Justice

Since the colonization of what is now known as the United States, Black and Native people have had parallel experiences of violence and oppression, and have been in each other's lives in different ways. While some Native groups provided sanctuary to formerly enslaved Africans, others made a lucrative business returning runaway enslaved people. While some Africans helped Natives, other Africans played a significant role in battles against Native Americans.